Topic: 4.1 Scheduled Aviation

A complete indexing and article service is available free from 1967 to 2000

An Analysis of Fortress Hubs in Airline Networks

This paper explores the possibility that the fortress hub is a consequence of the nature of airline hub-spoke rivalry. Entry into a competitor’s local market may reduce the entrant’s profit in his own market. As a result, there is a deterrent to entry if the negative effects are strong enough. The paper also examines the impacts of local competition on consumer surplus and total social surplus.

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The Impact of Low Cost Carriers on Airport and Route Competition

The entry of a low cost carrier onto a route leads to lower prices and higher passenger counts, both on other routes at the same airport and on competing routes at neighbouring airports. These effects indicate that consumer gains from the entry of low cost carriers are higher than previously estimated. A case study and an econometric analysis are used to estimate these effects.

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An Analysis of Fortress Hubs in Airline Networks

This paper explores the possibility that the fortress hub is a consequence of the nature of airline hub-spoke rivalry. Entry into a competitor’s local market may reduce the entrant’s profit in his own market. As a result, there is a deterrent to entry if the negative effects are strong enough. The paper also examines the impacts of local competition on consumer surplus and total social surplus.

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An Analysis of the Effects of European Aviation Deregulation on an Airline’s Network Structure and Choice of a Primary West-European Hub Airport

This paper focuses on the potential of specific airports to attract new services and carriers. A network simulation model is developed for an airline operating in a deregulated market, whose economic objectives are profit maximisation and market dominance. The model simulates the potential profits that this hypothetical airline can expect if it adopts a hub-and-spoke network with a specific airport as its hub.

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Airline Mergers: A Longer View

This paper examines relative fares and route competition for several years before and after the mergers. This captures trends that preceded the mergers as well as effects that take longer than a year to materialise. The results, which need to be interpreted with caution, suggest that the effects of some mergers are benign while others can lead to significant fare increases.

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A Structural Model of Intra-EU Duopoly Airline Competition

Using a two-countries/two-airlines framework, three different competition scenarios are analysed. These reflect the new EU competition rules. The results suggest that the use of hub-and-spoke networks results in significant welfare gains. In addition, the model shows that cross-border mergers may increase net social welfare.

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The Role of Wealth in Demand for International Air travel

The authors formulate and estimate a model of international air travel demand for Israel. Consumers’ wealth is found to be a significant determinant and failure to include it in the estimated equations yields price elasticities which are biased downward and income elasticities which are biased upward.

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