Optimal Subsidies for Public transit

Optimal Subsidies for Public transit

Professor Jackson presents a model for determining (1) optimal fare subsidies and (2) optimal subsidies for increasing transit speed. He concludes that no significant improvement is apparent unless marginal social cost per car passenger mile is at least 80 per cent above private cost in the highway sector.

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