A Simulation of Price Discriminating Tolls

A Simulation of Price Discriminating Tolls

A computer simulation is used to compared uniform tolls on a congested facility against a price-discriminating toll scheme. The simulation illustrates that consumers would gain from discriminatory tolls. Price-discriminating user fees on crowded facilities with rationing by queues should be given due consideration.

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